Drift, 2011

Drift (street view), 2011

Approximate Size:
8.5′ x 17′ x 8.5′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
5,000 pounds of second-hand clothing, wood & hardware

Description:
The clothing is sorted by color and arranged in the order of the spectrum. The piece starts and ends with blue, which forms the bottom and top layer, visible from inside the gallery. The clothing is rolled into whorls and layered, forming colorful striations viewable from the street. Both exposed cross-sections hover 12 inches before the storefront window. The design is inspired by the cross-section of a snowdrift.

This piece was created as a special project for the show: ”No Waste” at Columbia College, Chicago, IL. It would have never happened without the persistence of the curator Arti Sandhu and the gallery director Jennifer Murray. We had some hoops to jump through, one of them being the sourcing of 2.5 tons of clothing. USAgain, a national textile recycling company, rose to the occasion. Thanks to Rasham Grewal for believing in the project. Once we had the 2.5 tons, Columbia sent over an engineer and a fire warden. In the end, we got the green light, but not before they reinforced the gallery floor from w/in the basement. 4 days and about 50 helpers later (thanks Caroline Ross and Nicole Kurily!), the piece was done.

Drift Companion, 2011

Drift Companion, 2011

Approximate Size:
5′ x 5′ x 5′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
5,000 pounds of monochromatic second-hand clothing

© Derick Melander, 2012

Circuit, 2011

Circuit, 2011

Approximate Size:
5″ x 6.6″ x 10’ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Shoes, laces

Description:
33 pairs of shoes, daisy-chained together, forming an oval. One pair of shoes is removed, enabling the audience to literally “step up” and “close the loop”. While standing in the opening, the participant completes the oval. Every other lace is white, thus forming a dotted line, delineating this connectivity.

This piece was commissioned by TOMS Shoes. With every pair purchased, TOMS will give a pair of new shoes to a child in need. ONE FOR ONE.™ For more information visit TOMS.com

Into the Fold, Friends, 2010 (video)

Into the Fold, Friends (video), 2010

Approximate Size:
8′ x 8′ x 2′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood and steel

Description: As part of the Friends Seminary “Peace Week” celebration, I worked with parents and students to create an 8 x 8 foot clothing sculpture.

After a month, most of the clothing was sent to Haiti to support the relief effort.

Into the Fold, Friends, 2010

Into the Fold, Friends, 2010

Approximate Size:
8′ x 8′ x 2′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood and steel

Description: As part of the Friends Seminary “Peace Week” celebration, I worked with parents and students to create an 8 x 8 foot clothing sculpture.

After a month, most of the clothing was sent to Haiti to support the relief effort.

Am I Really All the Things That Are Outside Of Me?, 2009 (video)

Am I Really All the Things That Are Outside Of Me? (time lapse), 2009

Approximate Size:
7′ x 3′ x 3′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood & steel

Description:
A portrait of Joaquin Trujiilo, comprised of carefully folded and stacked second-hand clothing. Each garment is categorized by hue and crisscrossed around a central spine. The order is chosen at random.

This piece was created for the show “Homesick” at the Carnegie Art Museum. All the clothing was provided by Joaquin Trujiilo (half of the curatorial team Trujillo/Paumier) and his family. Collecting 900 lbs of clothing is a heroic effort, not to mention that both of them also folded with me for several days! Joaquin even recruited his sisters Margo and Gloria to help which is significant because they are tireless and super detail oriented. Much thanks to the museum staff as well.

Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009

Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (dispersed)
Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (dispersed)
Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (steps)
Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (steps)
Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (red/white)
Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (red/white)

Into the Fold (Brooklyn Borough Hall), 2009

Approximate Size:
6′ x 5′ x 5′ (H x W x D)

Description:
Working with over 20 volunteers, I created a monumental sculpture from 3,615 pounds of second hand clothing. The resulting piece was a 5 x 6 foot cube made in 4 sections.

Why 3,615 pounds? That’s the amount of textile waste created by New Yorkers every 5 minutes.

This event, hosted by the Office of Recycling Outreach and Education, was part of the 5th Annual Green Brooklyn…Green City Fair and Symposium at Brooklyn Borough Hall and Columbus Park. Clothing for the event was loaned by the textile recycling company, Wearable Collections.

Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (video)

Into The Fold, Brooklyn Borough Hall, 2009 (video)

Working with over 20 volunteers, I created a monumental sculpture from 3,615 pounds of second hand clothing. The resulting piece was a 5 x 6 foot cube made in 4 sections.

Why 3,615 pounds? That’s the amount of textile waste created by New Yorkers every 5 minutes.

This event, hosted by the Office of Recycling Outreach and Education, was part of the 5th Annual Green Brooklyn…Green City Fair and Symposium at Brooklyn Borough Hall and Columbus Park. Clothing for the event was loaned by the textile recycling company, Wearable Collections.

Video by Adam Kaufman

Into the Fold, 2009

 

Size:
76″ x 72″ x 72″ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Steel clothing drop bin, vinyl stickers

Description:
This piece was created for the Queens Museum, Q4 exhibition. A metal clothing drop bin was loaned by Goodwill Industries for the purpose of collecting clothing donations. I took photographs of a clothing sculpture I had just recently completed for another exhibition, had stickers made from the images, and wrapped the bin.

Every Sunday, during the 3 month run of the show, I came to the museum, took the donations from the bin into the museum, and folded clothing with museum guests.

We created a 4 foot tall and 5 foot wide cube, aranged by color.

The Queens Museum is located in Flushing Meadows Park, home of the 1964/65 New York Worlds Fair. If you look closely, you can see The Unisphere to the left behind my sculpture.

You can see the orange side of the cube on the right and the blue side on the left. At the corners, the colors criss-cross, much like the way bricks are layed.

All four sides of the cube were different. One side was blue, one was black and grey (that’s about 50% of what we were here in NYC), one side was cool colors and one side was warm colors, as seen here.

Each side of the cube was a different color scheme. This side is blue, but you can see warm color criss-crossed in on the right, and blacks and greys on the left.