Circuit, 2011

Circuit, 2011

Approximate Size:
5″ x 6.6″ x 10’ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Shoes, laces

Description:
33 pairs of shoes, daisy-chained together, forming an oval. One pair of shoes is removed, enabling the audience to literally “step up” and “close the loop”. While standing in the opening, the participant completes the oval. Every other lace is white, thus forming a dotted line, delineating this connectivity.

This piece was commissioned by TOMS Shoes. With every pair purchased, TOMS will give a pair of new shoes to a child in need. ONE FOR ONE.™ For more information visit TOMS.com

Galaxy, 2011

Galaxy, 2011

Approximate Size:
8″ x 32″ x 32″ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Scarves, thread, leather belts

Description:
60 scarves are sewn together, end-to-end and wound into a tight spiral. The individual garments are compressed into a single mass, a symbolic gesture that explores the conflicted space between society and the individual, a space that is ceaselessly broken and reconstituted (Hegel).

This piece was commissioned by PAi

Paramount Apparel International, Inc (PAi) was founded in 1929, and has become a leading headwear, apparel and accessories designer and supplier to many channels of distribution in the United States and internationally. For more
information visit PAIfashion.com

Into the Fold, Friends, 2010 (video)

Into the Fold, Friends (video), 2010

Approximate Size:
8′ x 8′ x 2′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood and steel

Description: As part of the Friends Seminary “Peace Week” celebration, I worked with parents and students to create an 8 x 8 foot clothing sculpture.

After a month, most of the clothing was sent to Haiti to support the relief effort.

Into the Fold, Friends, 2010

Into the Fold, Friends, 2010

Approximate Size:
8′ x 8′ x 2′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood and steel

Description: As part of the Friends Seminary “Peace Week” celebration, I worked with parents and students to create an 8 x 8 foot clothing sculpture.

After a month, most of the clothing was sent to Haiti to support the relief effort.

Am I Really All the Things That Are Outside Of Me?, 2009

Am I Really All the Things That Are Outside Of Me?, 2009

Approximate Size:
7′ x 3′ x 3′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood & steel

Description:
A portrait of Joaquin Trujiilo, comprised of carefully folded and stacked second-hand clothing. Each garment is categorized by hue and crisscrossed around a central spine. The order is chosen at random.

This piece was created for the show “Homesick” at the Carnegie Art Museum. All the clothing was provided by Joaquin Trujiilo (half of the curatorial team Trujillo/Paumier) and his family. Collecting 900 lbs of clothing is a heroic effort, not to mention that both of them also folded with me for several days! Joaquin even recruited his sisters Mago and Gloria to help which is significant because they are tireless and super detail oriented. Much thanks to the museum staff as well.

Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009

Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (dispersed)
Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (dispersed)
Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (steps)
Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (steps)
Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (red/white)
Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (red/white)

Into the Fold (Brooklyn Borough Hall), 2009

Approximate Size:
6′ x 5′ x 5′ (H x W x D)

Description:
Working with over 20 volunteers, I created a monumental sculpture from 3,615 pounds of second hand clothing. The resulting piece was a 5 x 6 foot cube made in 4 sections.

Why 3,615 pounds? That’s the amount of textile waste created by New Yorkers every 5 minutes.

This event, hosted by the Office of Recycling Outreach and Education, was part of the 5th Annual Green Brooklyn…Green City Fair and Symposium at Brooklyn Borough Hall and Columbus Park. Clothing for the event was loaned by the textile recycling company, Wearable Collections.

Silence, 2009

Silence, 2009

Approximate Size:
7′ x 5′ x 1.5′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood, sand, glue, closet with door (installation)

Description:
This site specific installation was created for System:System, an exhibition within an unoccupied 19th century convent.

The show was curated by Adam Henry and Christina Vassallo of Super Square and Random Number.

In a former nun’s quarters, I filled a doorway with second-hand clothing, walling off an interior space. Garments reclaimed from previous projects were randomly ordered, resulting in distinct value layers (which you can see if you squint a bit). More than any other work I have created, this piece reminds me of a geological cross-section.

I named this piece silence to address my mixed feelings about religion. On the one hand, I am regularly discriminated against by various religious leaders and individuals for being gay. On the other hand, I was raised a Christian. I’ve been the benefactor of Christian generosity (the space granted for this show for example). In the context of this heavily symbolic space, silence refers to self-oppression, to a spiritual vow of silence and also to the fact that these works absorb sound.

Into the Fold, 2009

 

Size:
76″ x 72″ x 72″ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Steel clothing drop bin, vinyl stickers

Description:
This piece was created for the Queens Museum, Q4 exhibition. A metal clothing drop bin was loaned by Goodwill Industries for the purpose of collecting clothing donations. I took photographs of a clothing sculpture I had just recently completed for another exhibition, had stickers made from the images, and wrapped the bin.

Every Sunday, during the 3 month run of the show, I came to the museum, took the donations from the bin into the museum, and folded clothing with museum guests.

We created a 4 foot tall and 5 foot wide cube, aranged by color.

The Queens Museum is located in Flushing Meadows Park, home of the 1964/65 New York Worlds Fair. If you look closely, you can see The Unisphere to the left behind my sculpture.

You can see the orange side of the cube on the right and the blue side on the left. At the corners, the colors criss-cross, much like the way bricks are layed.

All four sides of the cube were different. One side was blue, one was black and grey (that’s about 50% of what we were here in NYC), one side was cool colors and one side was warm colors, as seen here.

Each side of the cube was a different color scheme. This side is blue, but you can see warm color criss-crossed in on the right, and blacks and greys on the left.

Filter, 2009

Filter, 2009

Approximate Size:
8.5′ x 11′ x 1′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood and steel

Description:
This piece was created specifically for this location. It joins a wall with a column in the center of the room, creating an alcove in the gallery.