Night Sky, 2016

Size: 48″ x 38″ x 6″ (H x W x D)

Materials: Folded second-hand clothing, steel & wooden frame

Weight: Aprox. 200 lbs.

Display: Free standing or wall hung.

In New York City, the night sky never fully darkens. The buildings emit a warm, muted glow transitioning through bands of aqua, periwinkle, and lavender to a crown of royal blue. Only the brightest stars emerge.

The Painful Spectacle of Finding Oneself, 2010-11

The Painful Spectacle of Finding Oneself, 2010-11

Approximate Size:
6’ x 1’ x 1’ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Folded second-hand clothing, wood and steel

Description:
This series of works are each built in 2 sections which can combined and re-configured.

This work by Derick Melander is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Social Mobility, 2010

Social Mobility, 2010

Approximate Size:
6′ x 2′ x 2′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, steel, wood, casters, dog-leash

Description:
This piece is one of several created for a solo show at The University of Maryland. It was taken for regular walks around campus by gallery staff. This sticker occupied the space on the floor where the piece was displayed when at rest.

Into the Fold, Friends, 2010

Into the Fold, Friends, 2010

Approximate Size:
8′ x 8′ x 2′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood and steel

Description: As part of the Friends Seminary “Peace Week” celebration, I worked with parents and students to create an 8 x 8 foot clothing sculpture.

After a month, most of the clothing was sent to Haiti to support the relief effort.

Am I Really All the Things That Are Outside Of Me?, 2009

Am I Really All the Things That Are Outside Of Me?, 2009

Approximate Size:
7′ x 3′ x 3′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood & steel

Description:
A portrait of Joaquin Trujiilo, comprised of carefully folded and stacked second-hand clothing. Each garment is categorized by hue and crisscrossed around a central spine. The order is chosen at random.

This piece was created for the show “Homesick” at the Carnegie Art Museum. All the clothing was provided by Joaquin Trujiilo (half of the curatorial team Trujillo/Paumier) and his family. Collecting 900 lbs of clothing is a heroic effort, not to mention that both of them also folded with me for several days! Joaquin even recruited his sisters Mago and Gloria to help which is significant because they are tireless and super detail oriented. Much thanks to the museum staff as well.

Am I Really All the Things That Are Outside Of Me?, 2009 (video)

Am I Really All the Things That Are Outside Of Me? (time lapse), 2009

Approximate Size:
7′ x 3′ x 3′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood & steel

Description:
A portrait of Joaquin Trujiilo, comprised of carefully folded and stacked second-hand clothing. Each garment is categorized by hue and crisscrossed around a central spine. The order is chosen at random.

This piece was created for the show “Homesick” at the Carnegie Art Museum. All the clothing was provided by Joaquin Trujiilo (half of the curatorial team Trujillo/Paumier) and his family. Collecting 900 lbs of clothing is a heroic effort, not to mention that both of them also folded with me for several days! Joaquin even recruited his sisters Margo and Gloria to help which is significant because they are tireless and super detail oriented. Much thanks to the museum staff as well.

Silence, 2009

Silence, 2009

Approximate Size:
7′ x 5′ x 1.5′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood, sand, glue, closet with door (installation)

Description:
This site specific installation was created for System:System, an exhibition within an unoccupied 19th century convent.

The show was curated by Adam Henry and Christina Vassallo of Super Square and Random Number.

In a former nun’s quarters, I filled a doorway with second-hand clothing, walling off an interior space. Garments reclaimed from previous projects were randomly ordered, resulting in distinct value layers (which you can see if you squint a bit). More than any other work I have created, this piece reminds me of a geological cross-section.

I named this piece silence to address my mixed feelings about religion. On the one hand, I am regularly discriminated against by various religious leaders and individuals for being gay. On the other hand, I was raised a Christian. I’ve been the benefactor of Christian generosity (the space granted for this show for example). In the context of this heavily symbolic space, silence refers to self-oppression, to a spiritual vow of silence and also to the fact that these works absorb sound.