Into the Fold, 2009

 

Size:
76″ x 72″ x 72″ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Steel clothing drop bin, vinyl stickers

Description:
This piece was created for the Queens Museum, Q4 exhibition. A metal clothing drop bin was loaned by Goodwill Industries for the purpose of collecting clothing donations. I took photographs of a clothing sculpture I had just recently completed for another exhibition, had stickers made from the images, and wrapped the bin.

Every Sunday, during the 3 month run of the show, I came to the museum, took the donations from the bin into the museum, and folded clothing with museum guests.

We created a 4 foot tall and 5 foot wide cube, aranged by color.

The Queens Museum is located in Flushing Meadows Park, home of the 1964/65 New York Worlds Fair. If you look closely, you can see The Unisphere to the left behind my sculpture.

You can see the orange side of the cube on the right and the blue side on the left. At the corners, the colors criss-cross, much like the way bricks are layed.

All four sides of the cube were different. One side was blue, one was black and grey (that’s about 50% of what we were here in NYC), one side was cool colors and one side was warm colors, as seen here.

Each side of the cube was a different color scheme. This side is blue, but you can see warm color criss-crossed in on the right, and blacks and greys on the left.

Flesh of My Flesh, 2008

Flesh of My Flesh, 2008

Approximate Size:
10-12′ x 2′ x 2′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood and steel

Description:
A column of comprised of carefully folded and stacked second-hand clothing. Each garment is categorized by relative value and crisscrossed around a central spine. The darkest clothing is placed at the bottom and the top of the stack, transitioning to a white center.

A column of comprised of carefully folded and stacked second-hand clothing. Each garment is categorized by relative value and crisscrossed around a central spine. The darkest clothing is placed at the bottom and the top of the stack, transitioning to a white center.

Compression, 2007

Compression, 2007

Size:
8′ x 24″ x 24″ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood and steel

Description:
800 lbs. of carefully folded, second hand clothing, crisscrossed around a central spine.

Each article of clothing is categorized by relative value. The darkest clothing is placed at the bottom of the stack, while the lightest clothing is placed at the top.

Dither, 2006

Dither, 2006

Size:
5′ 6″ x 24″ x 24″ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood & steel

Description:
This work is compriesed of two stacks that sit side by side. The first stack is made from black, white and grey clothing while the second stack contains the full spectrum.

Between the stacks, shirt sleeves, pant legs and other linear shapes create bridge like apendages, connecting the stacks together.

Ligature, 2005

Ligature, 2005

Size:
15″ x 11.25″

Materials:
120 lb. white paper and pencil

Description:
An arc of stacked clothing with a network of belts providing lateral support.

The opening in the curved wall allows the average person to stand in the gap and peer inside. As they do so, their clothing acts as a bridge, transforming the arc into a circle.

Grasp (Maquette), 2004

Grasp (Maquette), 2004

Size:
10″ x 12″ x 12″ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Folded doll clothing, wood and thread

Description:
The overall shape of this piece refers to the form of a grasping hand. “The grasp reflex appears at birth and persists until five or six months of age. When an object is placed in the infant’s hand and strokes their palm, the fingers will close and they will grasp it. The reverse motion can be induced by stroking the back or side of the hand.”

Where Do I Stop, Where Do You Begin, 2003

Where Do I Stop, Where Do You Begin, 2003

Size variable, here:
10′ x 17″ x 12″ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Folded women’s clothing,
wood and steel

Description:
The near stack is comprised of women’s clothing, the one in the background is comprised of men’s. Both stacks extend from floor to ceiling and are site specific.

Clothing that is worn on top of other layers is placed at the bottom of the stacks, while clothing that is worn directly against the skin is placed at the top.