Derick Melander creates clothing sculptures that explore the intersection between global consumerism and the intimate relationship we have with what we wear.

Recent commissions include projects for The Chapman Perelman Foundation, Eileen Fisher, Diesel and Swire Properties, Hong Kong.

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The Making of “A Cloud Reveals the Moon”, 2018

Derick’s most recent works are made from second-hand clothing, sourced from specific locations and populations. He brings these populations together first as collaborators and then again in the clothing used to create the work. In a sense, these works are collective portraits. Derick celebrates and honors both the individual and the community in each work he creates.

Pride makes possible a kind of equilibrium, it allows me to feel OK. From that platform, I am empowered to fight for my rights, and love from my heart.
This sketch is for a sculpture series. I always feel a twinkle of joy when I see a blank sign or a marker that has lost its meaning. These objects draw our attention, but have nothing to say (like some people I know).
Working on an idea for a new sculpture. Pictured here, garment silhouettes are traced and cut from thin sheets of copper and distorted to appear as if they are caught in a whirlwind.
From 2002-2007, I was in an arts collective called Tag Projects. We built community, self-produced five exhibitions, sold work, and even got a rave review from Holland Cotter in The New York Times!
Here I am wearing my own creation called “A Shirts” made by daisy-chaining 4 dress shirts together at the plackets. I wore this all day at The Callicoon Art Walk in 2019.
You likely do not know this, but in addition to being a sculptor, I am a lover of industrial design. I have many sketches for functional objects, especially designs for furniture. Here is a design for a full-size folding screen. It takes its form from a deconstructed shirt cuff
The COVID-19 Pandemic is tragic on so many levels. When I learned that those infected and hospitalized were being separated from their loved ones, potentially dying among strangers, I felt a profound sense of grief. And as the pandemic progresses, seeing how it has disproportionally affected communities of color and the immigrant populations of New York City has shed new light on inequality and systemic racism.
I’m excited to share my interview with Kate Jetmore of The Listen Podcast. We had a great time talking about getting unstuck and, well, something paranormal happens…
I'm excited to be kicking off two projects with FIT this spring. I'll be presenting a visiting artist lecture and working as an artist in residence. I'll tell you how I came to focus on second-hand clothing, I'll review key projects and I'll share some entertaining case studies.