Separating Being From Becoming, 2018

Clothing Sculpture: Separating being from becoming, 2018 (after Aldous Huxley) 7’ x 28” x 28”
Clothing Sculpture: Separating being from becoming, 2018 (after Aldous Huxley) 7’ x 28” x 28”

This work, along with 2 others, was commissioned by Eileen Fisher. All the garments (approximately 800 lbs. in this piece) came from Renew, Eileen Fisher’s take-back and reuse program. They preserve the value of their clothes at every stage, in any condition. The garments are cleaned, repaired and re-sold, given to women in need and used to create new garments, textiles and art. This piece was installed in the Detroit store and will be on display for a year or so. After that, the garments will go back into the Renew program to be turned into something else.

With casters and an eye hook attached to the base, this piece can be rolled from one part of the store to another. This strategy harkens back to a piece I created for The University of Maryland in 2010 called Social Mobility.

Approximate Size:
7′ x 28′ x 28′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, wood, steel & casters

Note: The tile was inspired by Aldous Huxley’s book, The Doors of Perception.

More about this in the Blog.

Circuit, 2011

Shoe Sculpture: Circuit, 2011

33 pairs of shoes, daisy-chained together, forming an oval. One pair of shoes is removed, enabling the audience to literally “step up” and “close the loop”. While standing in the opening, the participant completes the oval. Every other lace is white, thus forming a dotted line, delineating this connectivity.

This piece was commissioned by TOMS Shoes. With every pair purchased, TOMS will give a pair of new shoes to a child in need. ONE FOR ONE.™ For more information visit TOMS.com

Approximate Size:
5″ x 6.6″ x 10’ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Shoes, laces

Voices, 2010

Interactive Clothing Sculpture Drawing: Voices, 2010

Size:
15″ x 11.25″

Materials:
200 lb. white paper, pencil and watercolor

Social Mobility, 2010

Clothing Sculpture: Social Mobility, 2010

This piece is one of several created for a solo show at The University of Maryland. It was taken for regular walks around campus by gallery staff. This sticker occupied the space on the floor where the piece was displayed when at rest.

Approximate Size:
6′ x 2′ x 2′ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Second-hand clothing, steel, wood, casters, dog-leash

Into the Fold (Brooklyn Borough Hall), 2009

Clothing Sculpture: Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (steps)
  • Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (steps)
  • Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (dispersed)
  • Into the Fold, Brooklyn, 2009 (red/white)
  • Into The Fold, Brooklyn Heights

Approximate Size:
6′ x 5′ x 5′ (H x W x D)

Description:
Working with over 20 volunteers, I created a monumental sculpture from 3,615 pounds of second hand clothing. The resulting piece was a 5 x 6 foot cube made in 4 sections.

Why 3,615 pounds? That’s the amount of textile waste created by New Yorkers every 5 minutes.

This event, hosted by the Office of Recycling Outreach and Education, was part of the 5th Annual Green Brooklyn…Green City Fair and Symposium at Brooklyn Borough Hall and Columbus Park. Clothing for the event was loaned by the textile recycling company, Wearable Collections.

Into the Fold (Brooklyn Borough Hall), 2009 (video)

Clothing Performance: Into The Fold, Brooklyn Heights

Into The Fold, Brooklyn Borough Hall, 2009 (video)

Working with over 20 volunteers, I created a monumental sculpture from 3,615 pounds of second hand clothing. The resulting piece was a 5 x 6 foot cube made in 4 sections.

Why 3,615 pounds? That’s the amount of textile waste created by New Yorkers every 5 minutes.

This event, hosted by the Office of Recycling Outreach and Education, was part of the 5th Annual Green Brooklyn…Green City Fair and Symposium at Brooklyn Borough Hall and Columbus Park. Clothing for the event was loaned by the textile recycling company, Wearable Collections.

Video by Adam Kaufman

Into the Fold (Queens Museum), 2009

Clothing Sculpture/Donation Bin: Into the Fold, 2009

Size:
76″ x 72″ x 72″ (H x W x D)

Materials:
Steel clothing drop bin, vinyl stickers

Description:
This piece was created for the Queens Museum, Q4 exhibition. A metal clothing drop bin was loaned by Goodwill Industries for the purpose of collecting clothing donations. I took photographs of a clothing sculpture I had just recently completed for another exhibition, had stickers made from the images, and wrapped the bin.

Every Sunday, during the 3 month run of the show, I came to the museum, took the donations from the bin into the museum, and folded clothing with museum guests.

We created a 4 foot tall and 5 foot wide cube, arranged by color.

The Queens Museum is located in Flushing Meadows Park, home of the 1964/65 New York Worlds Fair. If you look closely, you can see The Unisphere to the left behind my sculpture.

You can see the orange side of the cube on the right and the blue side on the left. At the corners, the colors criss-cross, much like the way bricks are layed.

All four sides of the cube were different. One side was blue, one was black and grey (that’s about 50% of what we were here in NYC), one side was cool colors and one side was warm colors, as seen here.

Each side of the cube was a different color scheme. This side is blue, but you can see warm color criss-crossed in on the right, and blacks and greys on the left.